Men’s Health Month: Mary Jane Minkin, M.D., OB/GYN Shares 5 Proactive Fertility Tips for Men When Trying to Conceive

Sperm. Lifestyle. Workouts. Support.

NEW HAVEN, Conn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–While infertility, or the inability to conceive after one year of trying used to be a woman’s problem, there is now a better understanding of the important role men play in conceiving. In at least half of all infertility cases, men are either the contributing or leading cause. To help couples better understand common fertility issues, Mary Jane Minkin, MD, OB/GYN, founder of MadameOvary.com, sheds light on male fertility factors and how men can be proactive in improving their fertility.

“The well-known advice for couples trying to conceive are centered around the woman’s fertile window or when she should start to abstain from alcohol,” says Mary Jane Minkin, MD, Clinical Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Yale University. “However, it takes two to tango, and couples should be aware of both female and male fertility issues to improve their odds of conceiving. As science and research continues to move forward in treating infertility, realize that there are ways to address male fertility, and that 90% of infertility cases are treatable with current medical therapies.”

Dr. Minkin suggests the below tips to help men be proactive when it comes to their fertility:

  1. Know your sperm count: Normal sperm count ranges from 20 million to 200 million+ sperm per millimeter of semen. If a doctor diagnoses low sperm count, there are many ways to treat it, including hormone treatments, surgery, and assisted reproductive technologies. Plus, the reason for low sperm count could be an undiagnosed infection, which could have an impact on their partner’s ability to conceive too.
  2. Help sperm to be stronger swimmers: Sperm mobility is important to conceiving as it is the way that the sperm finds its way to fertilize the egg. There are a variety of reasons for low sperm mobility, including genetics, smoking, or work activities that cause trauma to the genital region. If a man has low sperm mobility, consider using a fertility friendly lubricant that mimics natural fluids, like Pre-Seed, to help swimmers reach the egg.
  3. Make small lifestyle changes: Studies have attributed low sperm count and testosterone, contributing factors in difficulties conceiving, to poor a diet. Too much consumption of alcohol can also contribute to a poor sperm count, so consider cutting out drinking. “If trying to conceive, it may be time to nix those guilty pleasures and fill your diet with healthier options. A healthy diet and lifestyle will certainly aid in sperm count.” Supplement healthy meals with multivitamins, such as vitafusion Men’s Multi gummy vitamins.
  4. Don’t skip workouts: Working out can increase testosterone – making for stronger and faster sperm. Beneficial amounts of hormones and sperm count were observed in men who exercised on a regular basis, so “pump” it in and out of the bedroom for better chances of conceiving.
  5. Be supportive: Every couple’s journey to conception is unique. If you are just starting out or have been trying for a while, don’t forget that intimacy shared with a partner should be top priority and not treated like a chore. If you’ve been trying to conceive for one year with no success, make an appointment with a fertility specialist, and test for pregnancy with First Response Early Result that can show results 6 days sooner than a missed period. If 35 or older, see a fertility specialist after 6 months of not conceiving.

“The trying to conceive journey looks different for every couple,” adds Minkin. “Both partners should remember to be proactive about their health, modify their lifestyle accordingly, and if struggling to conceive, be supportive of one another and prioritize communication.”

Contacts

Lauren Powers

Lauren.powers@gcomworks.com
646 964 4446